Tagged: issue 4

burl scarf knitting pattern

Issue 4 Index : Naturally Celtic

I have desired, like every artist, to create a little world of the beautiful, pleasant, and significant things of this marred and clumsy world. WILLIAM BULTER YEATS, in The Celtic Twilight

Make it happen.

Burl Scarf knitting pattern

Burl Scarf

Double-drafted woolen-spun exotic yak yarn provides wonderful character for this scarf, also giving it a rustic charm not necessarily available with smoother wools. A refined cable surrounded by seed-stitch makes it attractive for both men and women to wear. [...]

Triskele Mittens knitting pattern

Triskele Mittens PDF

This set of colorwork mittens features a Celtic braid motif on the cuff, a unique triskele design for the back of the hand, and a couched diamond pattern on the palm. This pattern is great for using up small amounts of light fingering-weight yarn in your stash. [...]

Oir Spindle Bag knitting pattern

Oir Spindle Bag

This bag will transport your spindle and fiber with Celtic flair! The bag can be made as large or as small as you need and is a perfect way to show off a natural, rustic yarn. [...]

Contributors • 4

Please give it up for the wonderful folks who have contributed their design work, their expertise and their free time to Ennea Collective!

burl scarf - spin the yarn

Burl Scarf : spin the yarn

When I purchased my wheel, my sweetie David went with me. While I was testing wheels he was wandering around the shop burying his hands in the fibers that were on display. In the end he bought four ounces of yak, and requested I spin it up to make him a scarf. I knew nothing about yak fiber, but it was soft and a lovely earthy brown, so I was happy to agree.

Shepherd’s Realm • 4 – Nancy Zeller of Long Ridge Farm

I first learned about CVM/Romeldale sheep from an article written by Laurie Ball-Gisch for The Shepherd magazine in January 2002. I was raising a small flock of sheep but looking to commit to one breed with both preservation and fine wool in mind. And so began my instant fondness and affection for the rarest, most endangered breed of sheep in North America today.

Spindle Bag : spin the yarn

The theme of the April 2011 issue of Ennea revolves around Celtic connections – cabled projects and natural wools. Immediately my brain went to Ireland, with all their Celtic cables carved in stone and sheep wandering the lush, green hills. I know this is a stereotype, but it is such a pretty image.

Ballycastle Tam : spin the yarn

When I decided to design a traditional Fair Isle tam, I knew I wanted to use shetland wool. The unique “sticky” nature of this fiber makes it perfect to use for colorwork. I also knew that I wanted to match a yarn similar to Jamieson’s “jumper weight” Spindrift shetland yarn, as I’ve used that for colorwork before.

Spinster’s Corner • 4

If you are spinner, you know that it’s great fun choosing a fiber to spin, and simply sitting down at your wheel and letting yourself enjoy the process of creating yarn. There’s nothing wrong with that at all, but what if you want to reverse the process, and have a commercial yarn in mind that you’d like to duplicate for a specific project or project type?