Tagged: natural

Product Review : Notable Gnome

I was sent a lovely little box of Notable Gnome products to try out. Geared for folks who work with their hands, these products are made with all natural ingredients, many of them 100% vegan, are lightly scented and non-greasy, which makes them perfect for the dry winter months when your skin can use a little TLC. […]

foehn mitts knitting pattern

Foehn Mitts PDF

A foehn (pronounced like ‘feign’) wind is a hot dry wind which comes abruptly over the lee side of the mountain, also known as a ‘snow-eater’. The most well-known version of foehn winds in North America are the Chinooks over the Rocky Mountains. Like these winds, the Foehn Mitts will keep you warm and toasty, knit in fair isle style, doubling the warmth.[…]

Burl Scarf knitting pattern

Burl Scarf

Double-drafted woolen-spun exotic yak yarn provides wonderful character for this scarf, also giving it a rustic charm not necessarily available with smoother wools. A refined cable surrounded by seed-stitch makes it attractive for both men and women to wear. […]

Oir Spindle Bag knitting pattern

Oir Spindle Bag

This bag will transport your spindle and fiber with Celtic flair! The bag can be made as large or as small as you need and is a perfect way to show off a natural, rustic yarn. […]

Currach Stole knitting pattern

Currach Stole PDF

This stole features an easy lace pattern that looks like currachs, small curved-hull Irish fishing boats, bobbing through the waves. This project knits up quickly using DK-weight yarn, and can be knit using multiple colors, but would also look great in a solid color. […]

Spindle Bag : spin the yarn

The theme of the April 2011 issue of Ennea revolves around Celtic connections – cabled projects and natural wools. Immediately my brain went to Ireland, with all their Celtic cables carved in stone and sheep wandering the lush, green hills. I know this is a stereotype, but it is such a pretty image.

Ballycastle Tam : spin the yarn

When I decided to design a traditional Fair Isle tam, I knew I wanted to use shetland wool. The unique “sticky” nature of this fiber makes it perfect to use for colorwork. I also knew that I wanted to match a yarn similar to Jamieson’s “jumper weight” Spindrift shetland yarn, as I’ve used that for colorwork before.